Slant 6 – Soda Pop * Rip Off: #716 of best 1,000 albums ever!

Slant 6 - Soda Pop Rip Off

Why is Slant 6’s Soda Pop * Rip Off on my best 1,000 albums ever list?

Some bands and some albums hit a bunch of my musical sweet spots at once.

Some stats & info about Slant 6 – Soda Pop * Rip Off

  • What kind of musical stylings does this album represent? Punk Rock, New Wave, Rock Music, Alternative Rock, Grunge
  • Rolling Stone’s greatest 500 albums ranking – not ranked!
  • All Music’s rating4 out of 5 stars
  • When was Soda Pop * Rip Off released? 1994
  • My ranking, the one you’re reading right now – #716 out of 1,000

Slant 6’s Soda Pop * Rip Off on Spotify

What does the “best 1,000 albums ever” mean and why are you doing this?

Yeah, I know it’s audacious, a little crazy (okay, maybe a lot cray cray), bordering on criminal nerdery.

But here’s what it’s NOT: a definitive list of the Greatest Albums of All-Time. This is 100% my own personal super biased, incredibly subjective review of what my top 1,000 albums are, ranked in painstaking order over the course of doing research for nearly a year, Rob from High Fidelity style. Find out more about why I embarked on a best 1,000 albums ever project.

What does Slant 6’s Soda Pop * Rip Off mean to me? What does it make me feel? Why is it exciting or compelling?

Some bands and some albums hit a bunch of my musical sweet spots at once.

1990s punk rock that’s a nice balance of aggressive and melodic (with a nice little dusting of grunge): check. Compelling female vocals (in this case an all female lineup that includes Myra Power, Christina Billotte, and Marge Marshall): check. A sound that feels a little bit Elastica, a little bit Veruca Salt, with a little Distillers-y twist, perhaps?

Check, check, check-ety out Slant 6’s Soda Pop * Rip Off. Also, as aside: great album title.

Soda Pop * Rip Off is the kind of album that’s remarkably consistent and just about any track will give a very quick and very good audio example of what Slant 6 is capable of throwing down.

I get more into “Love Shock” every time I listen to it. There’s a little Bleach-era Nirvana in the grunge-y opening bass line, before guitar (which has a tone to it that always makes me think of Elastica) and vocal harmonies (that always make me think of Veruca Salt). It’s purposely restrained with a perfectly sludge-y tone that all works well together.

“Don’t You Ever” picks up the pace in the way that reminds me of influences ranging from the Ramones to The Runaways.

“Double Edged Knife” has especially good guitar effective and a really nice head bobbing groove.