Thunderball – Scorpio Rising: #889 of best 1,000 albums ever!

Thunderball - Scorpio Rising

Why is Thunderball’s Scorpio Rising on my best 1,000 albums ever list?

An incredible soundtrack for a movie that doesn’t exist.

Some stats & info about Thunderball – Scorpio Rising  

  • What kind of musical stylings does this album represent? Electronic Music, Martini Lounge, Lounge Music, Dance Music
  • Rolling Stone’s greatest 500 albums ranking – not ranked!
  • All Music’s rating4.5 out of 5 stars
  • When was Scorpio Rising released? 2001
  • My ranking, the one you’re reading right now – #889 out of 1,000

Thunderball’s Scorpio Rising on Spotify

What does the “best 1,000 albums ever” mean and why are you doing this?

Yeah, I know it’s audacious, a little crazy (okay, maybe a lot cray cray), bordering on criminal nerdery.

But here’s what it’s NOT: a definitive list of the Greatest Albums of All-Time. This is 100% my own personal super biased, incredibly subjective take on what my top 1,000 albums are, ranked in painstaking order over the course of doing research for nearly a year, Rob from High Fidelity style. Find out more about why I embarked on a best 1,000 albums ever project.

What does Thunderball’s Scorpio Rising mean to me? What does it make me feel? Why is it exciting or compelling?

I’m a sucker for upbeat, atmospheric music that fits in well as a backdrop for either focused work or having a cocktail and conversations with friends. Scorpio Rising is just that, but there’s an entirely different level where it feels like a chic and incredible soundtrack for a movie that just happens to not exist.

“Heart of the Hustler,” for example, with its electronic beats and retro cool Curtis Mayfield-esque funk, could easily find its way into Tarantino circa Jackie Brown or Guy Ritchie’s early Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch era.

“Vai Vai,” on the other hand, has the lush production, snappy jazz vibe, and luxuriant atmosphere of high end cocktail lounges. Think the Ocean’s 11 franchise here, or perhaps American Hustle.

The variety throughout is one of the album’s strengths. “Stereo Tonic” mixes in an eastern or Indian vibe with hip hop in a way that is both unique and pleasing.

And finally, “Vibrations” is mysterious electronica that I would bet money would get the attention of the likes of a Beck, the Beastie Boys, or sample-happy DJs worldwide.