Zero 7 – Simple Things: #883 of best 1,000 albums ever

Zero 7 - Simple Things

Why is Zero 7’s Simple Things on my best 1,000 albums ever list?

An enveloping, elegant vibe that brings true musical pleasures.

Some stats & info about Zero 7 – Simple Things

  • What kind of musical stylings does this album represent? Electronic Music, Trip-Hop, Dance Music, Techno Music, Martini Lounge, Lounge Music
  • Rolling Stone’s greatest 500 albums ranking – not ranked!
  • All Music’s rating4 out of 5 stars
  • When was Simple Things released? 2001
  • My ranking, the one you’re reading right now – #883 out of 1,000

Zero 7’s Simple Things on Spotify

What does the “best 1,000 albums ever” mean and why are you doing this?

Yeah, I know it’s audacious, a little crazy (okay, maybe a lot cray cray), bordering on criminal nerdery.

But here’s what it’s NOT: a definitive list of the Greatest Albums of All-Time. This is 100% my own personal super biased, incredibly subjective take on what my top 1,000 albums are, ranked in painstaking order over the course of doing research for nearly a year, Rob from High Fidelity style. Find out more about why I embarked on a best 1,000 albums ever project.

What does Zero 7’s Simple Things mean to me? What does it make me feel? Why is it exciting or compelling?

There’s something about “In the Waiting Line” that’s elegant, subtle, chill, and groovy all at once, and really sets apart this album and Zero 7 as music that you want to hear when it’s time to relax in a refined setting, while working, or anytime really. And when the chorus hits, the vocals are almost unfair good on top of the mood and vibe that the song has already established.

Zero 7 is “adult” music that I wouldn’t have thought much of when I was a kid, but maturing into this kind of enveloping vibe has its true pleasures.

“Give It Away” brings a slant of soulful chill to the elegant and groovy mix.

And I really dig “End Theme” because, like Thunderball’s Scorpio Rising (#889 of my 1,000 best albums ever), it feels like an incredible soundtrack piece to a movie that doesn’t exist.

This album also sounds like

Morcheeba and Massive Attack for sure, and throw in Thievery Corporation for good measure.