Unit 4+2 – Greatest Hits: #825 of best 1,000 albums ever!

Unit 4+2 - Greatest Hits

Why is Unit 4+2’s Greatest Hits on my best 1,000 albums ever list?

It’s fun and rock and pop and a little quirky and very British Invasion.

Some stats & info about Unit 4+2 – Greatest Hits

  • What kind of musical stylings does this album represent? British Bands, Rock, Rock Music, Garage Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Pop, Pop Music
  • Rolling Stone’s greatest 500 albums ranking – not ranked!
  • All Music’s rating – not rated!  
  • When was Unit 4+2’s Greatest Hits released? 2011
  • My ranking, the one you’re reading right now – #825 out of 1,000

Unit 4+2’s Greatest Hits on Spotify

What does the “best 1,000 albums ever” mean and why are you doing this?

Yeah, I know it’s audacious, a little crazy (okay, maybe a lot cray cray), bordering on criminal nerdery.

But here’s what it’s NOT: a definitive list of the Greatest Albums of All-Time. This is 100% my own personal super biased, incredibly subjective take on what my top 1,000 albums are, ranked in painstaking order over the course of doing research for nearly a year, Rob from High Fidelity style. Find out more about why I embarked on a best 1,000 albums ever project.

What does Unit 4+2’s Greatest Hits mean to me? What does it make me feel? Why is it exciting or compelling?

Because I see so much of life through the prism of pop culture – which… makes sense, given that I’ve embarked on why I define above as an audacious and crazy project to rank 1,000 albums in terms of the best-est ever – when I listen to “Concrete and Clay,” Unit 4+2’s bona fide one-hit (wonder) back in the day (that day being 1965), it sounds like the greatest song that never (yet) got inserted into a Quentin Tarantino song.

It’s fun and rock and pop and a little quirky and very British invasion.

Here’s “Concrete and Clay,” performed at someplace called The Barbican, which delightfully doubles down on all of the above points. They’re mostly performing at a construction site because why… oh, the concrete, of course!

Pretty epic chorus, too, along these lines.

The sidewalks in the street
The concrete and the clay beneath my feet
Begins to crumble
But love will never die
Because we’ll see the mountains tumble
Before we say goodbye

I’m a sucker for the mid-‘60s British Invasion sound, so I can’t get enough of songs like “Too Fast, Too Slow.” Is it quite at the level of The Beatles, or even The Kinks or The Zombies? No, but what is?

At 40 songs, this greatest hits package plays really well if you’re looking for an afternoon of fun deep cuts. “I Won’t Let You Down,” for example, is pretty incredible, with nice subtle vocal harmonies on top of a swinging British ‘60s rock beat (that winks a little bit too at the emerging Beach Boys surf rock vibe?).